FILMS made at Engage London workshop

Engage London’s tutor Jack Soper helped our Engage teams from Romania, London, Spain and Germany create eight fab social journalism short films just using a mobile phone. In Spain they call this mo jo (mobile journalism) in London we call it brilliant

Media trainer Jack Soper, Philipp, Barbara Schofield from City, University of London, Kristie and Brandon who were commended for their film about being European. (c) Savvas Panas/Engage London

Salah Mohamed, trainer jack Soper, Rahim Amin and Brandon Richards with Engage Europe certificates for completing the Engage London workshop (c) Barbara Schofield/Engage London

According to Barbara Schofield, from City, University of London, who co-ordinated the Engage London workshop, the visitors did well. “They’ve done brilliantly and in a short time made high quality films about mental health, staying safe and being European. We set them a challenge to create a social video which highlights the issues and are really impressed with their work. It was effective and thoughtful.”

Special commendations went to Kris, Allesandra and Salah for their mental health video; Lola, Julia and Ignasi for their staying safe in the city video and Philipp, Kristie and Brandon for their ‘how European do you feel?’ video. All eight films were fab. Well done Engage Europe.

If you’d like to have a go making a short film then download a phone app, either: https://quik.gopro.com/en/ (available on both Android and iOS) OR https://www.apple.com/uk/clips/

THE FILMS FROM ENGAGE LONDON WORKSHOP can be watched below. Enjoy, and let us know what you think of them.

TOPIC: MENTAL HEALTH

FILM 1

FILM 2 commended

FILM 3

TOPIC: STAYING SAFE IN LONDON

FILM 4

FILM 5 commended

FILM 6

 

TOPIC: BEING EUROPEAN

FILM 7

FILM 8 commended

not available

  • Let us know what you think of them. Have they inspired you to make your own short films?

 

 

Brussels: thinking refugees #6

Is Brussels unique in its growing gap between those who help migrants by offering homestays, and those who’d lock them up or send them back. Or is it just another European city and country struggling to deal with the migrant crisis? Matt Hardy from Engage London takes an overview

Telling graffiti on the Military School in central Brussels which is now being used to house refugees. Photo inspired by workshops during the Engage Europe summer school at IHECS (c) Engage London/Matt Hardy

Brussels is the capital of Belgium, the home of European Politics and the famous Manneken Pis fountain. It’s also home to a refugee crisis, rising homelessness and a growing divide between rich and poor.

A cornerstone of the EU rule book is that an asylum seeker should seek protection from the first EU country they arrive at, and not travel onwards — a phenomenon known as “secondary movement”. (Financial Times)

But who and how should be helping? In Brussels, the home city of European politics, locals are currently breaking the law to help undocumented migrants. Thanks to Facebook – Platforme Citoyen (which has 47,000 members) every evening at the Parc Maximilien, near the Gare du Nord station, up to 400 migrants gather wait for the hundreds of Belgians who will offer them an overnight home stay. They do this to outwit officials after mass arrests of undocumented people sleeping in the park. It’s been happening since the Calais jungle in France, where 6,000 migrants lived, was shut down. Most of these asylum seekers don’t want to stay in Belgium, their goal is to reach the UK.

This film from Aljazeera explains more.

https://www.aljazeera.com/indepth/features/brussels-refugee-bnb-180103082106214.html

In Brussels this citizen initiative may change as soon as a new detention centre is built as the right wing coalition government’s plan is for these migrants to be housed there.

Nearly 500 miles east of Brussels is Berlin, the capital city of Germany. Germany is home to a conservative coalition government, led by Angela Merkel, which is currently on the verge of reshaping the European viewpoint on refugees.  On the same day that the Engage London team, which included two former child refugees, left Brussels, Merkel was at the European Parliament arguing the case for sending asylum seekers back to their entry point into Europe, shifting the political crisis south.

Whose responsibility?
Already the southern European countries of the continent such as Italy and Spain are on the receiving end of the countless refugee boats that are entering Europe from north Africa.

The inhabitants of the boats? Those fleeing persecution, war and those searching for a better life from their war-torn and/or intolerant nations such as Syria, Iraq, Eritrea, South Sudan and Ethiopia.

Countries on the Mediterranean sea are beginning to close their boarders to such ships, believing that countries further inland aren’t doing their share of offering asylum.

And they are right. Recently Merkel and her prop-up coalition (Christian Democratic Union with the smaller Christian Social Union)announced a new migrant plan that includes transit zones (detention centres in all but name) in southern Germany, designed to deport “ineligible asylum seekers”. These are the very sort of centres the European Commission condemned Donald Trump for opening in the US which deliberately split babies and children from their parents and family members.

New direction
Detention centres in Germany will forcerefugees to go elsewhere. A panicked Austria (which took in many refugees during the Bosnian conflict of 1992-95) already has plans to close their borders to stop the refugees from settling in the land-locked state. This would go against the free movement of people policy valued so highly by the European Commission, and they are unlikely to be the last country to put in place such measures.

The culmination of these decisions? The refugees will head for France, Belgium and Britain because other countries are closed.

It’s clearly more complex than what’s outlined above. But the point is clear; Germany, Austria and Italy have already put measures in place to deter migrants. Will Belgium do the same? Brussels is a city of hope and prosperity to some, and the final destination for others but to everyone, it’s a city that needs to do more to protect its growing diverse population.

  • See the Facebook page, Citizen Hosting Platform (Platforme Citoyen) which has  https://www.facebook.com/plateformerefugiesbxl/ and follow the hashtag #HelpIsNoCrime
  • Keep up to date with Matt Hardy via twitter @matthardyjourno and @thepoliticosuk

Engage London has approx 27 members – a lucky eight were able to attend the Brussels summer school at IHECS from 24-28 June. They were Pilion Trust’s Rahim Amin, Favour Ekengwu, Naomi Gahie, Charlie Tshibangu and City’s journalism undergrads Matt Hardy, Alun Macer-Wright, Diana Serenli, Meagan Walker. Big thanks to Engage Europe for creating this opportunity.

 

The Facebook group that enables Belgians to offer homestays to migrants.

Brussels: workshops in pix #4

Photo collection from Engage London’s Rahim Amin illustrating the scope of what was offered at the Brussels workshop run by Engage Europe at IHECS in June

Meet Rahim

Rahim Amin at the Engage Europe summer school at IHECS in Brussels. He joined the radio/sound workshop, graffiti which involved long walks around Brussels and photography (c) Engage London/Matt Hardy

Graffiti workshops

Finding boundaries in the image (c) Engage London/Rahim Amin

Finding boundaries in the image (c) Engage London/Rahim Amin

Looking at boundaries (c) Engage London/Rahim Amin

Working on radio techniques – with a focus on sound

The lads in the studio with Rahim on the right (c) Engage London/Matt Hardy

#HearMeSpeak broadcasting in Brussels during the radio sound workshop

After the workshops

Rahim Amin in Brussels (c) Engage London/Matt Hardy

 

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Engage London has approx 27 members – a lucky eight were able to attend the Brussels summer school at IHECS from 24-28 June. They were Pilion Trust’s Rahim Amin, Favour Ekengwu, Naomi Gahie, Charlie Tshibangu and City’s journalism undergrads Matt Hardy, Alun Macer-Wright, Diana Serenli, Meagan Walker. Big thanks to Engage Europe for creating this opportunity.

Brussels: sharing ideas #3

The trip to Brussels was an amazing experience writes Favour Ekengwu, one of the Engage London participants at the Engage Europe media workshops.

Scenes from the photo booth at the IHECS hosted party at Loft 58. The workshop participants were from London, Barcelona, Tubingen, Cluj, Mechlen and Brussels. (c) Engage London/Matt Hardy

From the time we got on the train to Brussels the Eurostar stewards were really outgoing and were able to teach us the basics of French.

Favour Ekengwu during the graffiti workshop (c) Engage London/Matt Hardy

The people in Brussels were very approachable. It was an interesting experience; we received a warm welcome from the professors who prepared the programs. They spoke in English which was very helpful because most of understand (it’s the lingua franca of Europe).

Favour Ekengwu during the photo portrait workshop (c) Engage London/Matt Hardy

I particularly enjoyed the photo portrait workshop because we were outside in the city and I got to see what happened within the community. I was intrigued because the neighbourhood was really friendly and they were patient enough to hear us out when we wanted to introduce them to what we were doing in the workshop.

Favour Ekengwu at IHECS, Brussels at the party to celebrate the end of the workshop. (c) Engage London

Engage London has approx 27 members – a lucky eight were able to attend the Brussels summer school at IHECS from 24-28 June. They were Pilion Trust’s Rahim Amin, Favour Ekengwu, Naomi Gahie, Charlie Tshibangu and City’s journalism undergrads Matt Hardy, Alun Macer-Wright, Diana Serenli, Meagan Walker. Big thanks to Engage Europe for creating this opportunity.

Brussels: gallery from Engage Europe summer school #2

Engage London sent eight young people to the Engage Europe media summer school in Brussels, hosted by the programme co-ordinator, IHECS. Here’s the story in eight portraits

1 We’ve arrived in Belgium for summer school (25-28 June 2018)

Brussels Midi – Charlie, Naomi, Nicola, Savvas, Diana, Favour, Meagan, Matt, Rahim (and one more to join us, Alun) (c) Engage London

2 Here’s where we are staying, Hostel Bruegel, close to Sablon

Engage Europe participants meet up – here are students and staff from Spain, Germany and London (UK). There were also staff and students from Cluj-Napol in Romania. (c) Engage London

3 Last team member to join us

Alun Macer-Wright makes the first day’s plenary at IHECS, a journalism/media uni in Belgium, just in time to join the Engage Europe workshops with students and young people from Romania, Spain, Germany, Belgium and the UK. IHECS journalism school is close to the famous Manneken Pis (c) Engage London

4 IHECS journalism school is in the centre of Brussels

IHECS (this pic will be changed to the full group portrait when it is sent on from Engage Europe) (c) Engage London

5 Trip to the European Parliament (Engage Europe is co-funded by the Erasmus Programme of the EU)

First time visit to the European Parliament for five Engage London students – Charlie, Favour Alun, Diana and Naomi – who met Julie Ward, MEP for North West England (c) Engage London

6 A taster from just one of the workshops linking civil society with uni skills – this one involved portrait photography #baghead #ostcollective

In the back streets of Brussels summer school workshop had turned a garage into a photo studio to connect academia with civil society and mix up the formal portrait using skills of #octcollective. Here are Pilion Trust CEO Savvas Panas and Islington Faces’ Nicola Baird in disguise (c) Engage London

7 After sharing our summer school work there were certificates and a party

Scenes from the photo booth at the IHECS hosted party at Loft 58 – Romanians, British, Spanish, German and Belgian students all know how to party. (c) Engage London/Matt Hardy

8 Goodbye lunch

Delicious lunch at Les Cercle des Voyageurs near IHECS, in Brussels (c) Engage London

Engage London has approx 27 members – a lucky eight were able to attend the Brussels summer school at IHECS from 24-28 June. They were Pilion Trust’s Rahim Amin, Favour Ekengwu, Naomi Gahie, Charlie Tshibangu and City’s journalism undergrads Matt Hardy, Alun Macer-Wright, Diana Serenli, Meagan Walker. Big thanks to Engage Europe for creating this opportunity.

Romania workshop: live digital

Nobody on the Engage London team had been to Romania before, so there was real excitement about going to Cluj-Napoca. Here’s a brief photo story showing some of our workshop highlights.

Pic 1: Introducing ourselves

Engage London presentation in Romania by Pandora Khody, Surelle Stevens and Savvas Panas. (c) Engage London

Pic 2: Trying live reporting

Pandora Khody reporting live from Romania. (c) BS/Engage London                                 1)Here’s Pandora Khody reporting about the digital revolution in Cluj.

2) Blow enjoy the TV voice over made about Romanian sport, starring Surelle Stevens.

Pic 3: Getting to know a place

Exploring the streets of Cluj-Napoca on the last morning. (c) SP/Engage London

Barbara, Savvas and Nicola made clear to the Engage London participants before the Romania trip that: “It’s a WORKING TRIP, not a holiday. The visit includes some sightseeing, but attendance and participation at the workshop is expected.” So it was good that there was some sightseeing built into the workshop schedule. We all liked discovering this student city.

Pic 4: Selfie sightseeing

Surelle Stevens: “Cluj was amazing”. (c) SS/Engage London

Summing up
Engage London learnt many things on this trip. Huge thanks to Engage/Inspire Romania for this opportunity. Savvas from the Pilion Trust: “Our visit to Cluj was lovely. Cristina and colleagues picked us up and looked after us so well. We had good interaction with the team.”

There were four teams at Romania, here are the other two films.

 

Meet the team: Charlie Tshibangu

Meet our Engage London team in Brussels. Here’s Charlie Tshibangu. Interview by Favour Ekengwu, Naomi Gahie and Rahmin Amin

Charlie Tshibangu (c) Hugh Gary Photography

Charlie, 23, was looking for employment when this interview was done but has already found a warehouse job.

Q: Where do you live?
I’m from the Congo. I came to London when I was eight. It was weird because I was put into foster care with a Jamaican family. We (Charlie and his siblings) weren’t allowed to speak French. It was difficult.

Q: How come you’re involved in the Pilion Trust?
My friend was here,  Melvin, he brought me here in 2016. I got along with Savvas so I get invited. And he helps me with food if I have no food in the house.

Q: What are your interests?
Football. From 16-18 and a half I used to play reserves for Boreham Wood. I was a centre back so I played in defence. I got realistic, I didn’t think I’d make it.  It’s like the lottery, not everyone makes it.

Q: It’s the World Cup how will you concentrate?
I will do my work but whenever there’s a break then I will want to watch it. I just love football – I like all the teams. I don’t think Brussels will win. Maybe England!

Q: Do you like live football?
I used to work at Arsenal on match days. Every time I watched I couldn’t stop smiling.

Q: What are you expecting from Brussels’ summer school?
Not sure yet.

  • Engage Europe is running a summer school from 24-28 June.