FILMS made at Engage London workshop

Engage London’s tutor Jack Soper helped our Engage teams from Romania, London, Spain and Germany create eight fab social journalism short films just using a mobile phone. In Spain they call this mo jo (mobile journalism) in London we call it brilliant

Media trainer Jack Soper, Philipp, Barbara Schofield from City, University of London, Kristie and Brandon who were commended for their film about being European. (c) Savvas Panas/Engage London

Salah Mohamed, trainer jack Soper, Rahim Amin and Brandon Richards with Engage Europe certificates for completing the Engage London workshop (c) Barbara Schofield/Engage London

According to Barbara Schofield, from City, University of London, who co-ordinated the Engage London workshop, the visitors did well. “They’ve done brilliantly and in a short time made high quality films about mental health, staying safe and being European. We set them a challenge to create a social video which highlights the issues and are really impressed with their work. It was effective and thoughtful.”

Special commendations went to Kris, Allesandra and Salah for their mental health video; Lola, Julia and Ignasi for their staying safe in the city video and Philipp, Kristie and Brandon for their ‘how European do you feel?’ video. All eight films were fab. Well done Engage Europe.

If you’d like to have a go making a short film then download a phone app, either: https://quik.gopro.com/en/ (available on both Android and iOS) OR https://www.apple.com/uk/clips/

THE FILMS FROM ENGAGE LONDON WORKSHOP can be watched below. Enjoy, and let us know what you think of them.

TOPIC: MENTAL HEALTH

FILM 1

FILM 2 commended

FILM 3

TOPIC: STAYING SAFE IN LONDON

FILM 4

FILM 5 commended

FILM 6

 

TOPIC: BEING EUROPEAN

FILM 7

FILM 8 commended

not available

  • Let us know what you think of them. Have they inspired you to make your own short films?

 

 

PHOTOS: Engage London highlights

Engage London was delighted to host Engage Europe for a media journalism workshop from 11-13 October. Thank you all for attending. Here are some highlights:

DAY 1: Welcome event at City, University of London attended by the Mayor of Islington

Engage London’s Brandon from the Pilion Trust and City students ready to welcome Engage Europe participants (c) Lindsay Greenhouse/Engage London

The Mayor of Islington meets Engage Romania delegates and Engage London’s Brandon and Gideon (c) Lindsay Greenhouse/Engage London

Engage Europe welcome event in B200 –  “It looks like the European Parliament.” The Mayor of Islington is an alumnus of City.  (c) Lindsay Greenhouse/Engage London

Welcome to Ringcross from Salah Mohamed. Engage London hosted an amazing dinner (c) Lindsay Greenhouse/Engage London

Ringcross guests (c) Lindsay Greenhouse/Engage London

DAY 2: Making films & socialising 

Creating and editing films on phones took all day Friday. Eight were made looking at mental health; staying safe in the city and being European. (c) Lindsay Greenhouse/Engage London

 

Gallipoli Again dinner for all the Engage Europe workshop participants (c) Savvas Panas/Engage London

Laura Lepetre, Brussels; Nicola Baird, Engage London, Kiron Pataka, Tubingen, Savvas Panas, Engage London; Rares Beuran, Cluj at the Peasant with City’s Richard Evans and Barbara Schofield (c) Nicola Baird/Engage London

DAY 3 Certificates, film sharing & goodbyes

Breakfast in the Great Hall foyer for Engage London’s Brenda Ariadna, Holly Chacksfield and Rahim Amin (c) Nicola Baird/Engage London

Trainer Jack Soper with Philipp, Barbara Schofield, Kristie and Brandon who made a standout film on being European (c) Savvas Panas/Engage London

Kris, Barbara, Allessandra and Salah who made a standout film on mental health (c) Lindsay Greenhouse/Engage London

Trainer Jack Soper and Engage London’s Barbara Schofield with Julia, Lola and Ignasi who made a standout film about staying safe in London. (c) Lindsay Greenhouse/Engage London

Final day, after the certificates (c) Lindsay Greenhouse/Engage London

Final tour of Islington Museum, St Paul’s Cathedral and Tate Modern art gallery thanks to an Engage London selfie with colleagues from Romania, Germany and Brussels. (c) Engage London

 

Big thank you to our photographer Lindsay Greenhouse. And also to everyone who helped make the event such a success. Apologies for some family names being missed off – hope to change that soon.

 

Brussels: thinking refugees #6

Is Brussels unique in its growing gap between those who help migrants by offering homestays, and those who’d lock them up or send them back. Or is it just another European city and country struggling to deal with the migrant crisis? Matt Hardy from Engage London takes an overview

Telling graffiti on the Military School in central Brussels which is now being used to house refugees. Photo inspired by workshops during the Engage Europe summer school at IHECS (c) Engage London/Matt Hardy

Brussels is the capital of Belgium, the home of European Politics and the famous Manneken Pis fountain. It’s also home to a refugee crisis, rising homelessness and a growing divide between rich and poor.

A cornerstone of the EU rule book is that an asylum seeker should seek protection from the first EU country they arrive at, and not travel onwards — a phenomenon known as “secondary movement”. (Financial Times)

But who and how should be helping? In Brussels, the home city of European politics, locals are currently breaking the law to help undocumented migrants. Thanks to Facebook – Platforme Citoyen (which has 47,000 members) every evening at the Parc Maximilien, near the Gare du Nord station, up to 400 migrants gather wait for the hundreds of Belgians who will offer them an overnight home stay. They do this to outwit officials after mass arrests of undocumented people sleeping in the park. It’s been happening since the Calais jungle in France, where 6,000 migrants lived, was shut down. Most of these asylum seekers don’t want to stay in Belgium, their goal is to reach the UK.

This film from Aljazeera explains more.

https://www.aljazeera.com/indepth/features/brussels-refugee-bnb-180103082106214.html

In Brussels this citizen initiative may change as soon as a new detention centre is built as the right wing coalition government’s plan is for these migrants to be housed there.

Nearly 500 miles east of Brussels is Berlin, the capital city of Germany. Germany is home to a conservative coalition government, led by Angela Merkel, which is currently on the verge of reshaping the European viewpoint on refugees.  On the same day that the Engage London team, which included two former child refugees, left Brussels, Merkel was at the European Parliament arguing the case for sending asylum seekers back to their entry point into Europe, shifting the political crisis south.

Whose responsibility?
Already the southern European countries of the continent such as Italy and Spain are on the receiving end of the countless refugee boats that are entering Europe from north Africa.

The inhabitants of the boats? Those fleeing persecution, war and those searching for a better life from their war-torn and/or intolerant nations such as Syria, Iraq, Eritrea, South Sudan and Ethiopia.

Countries on the Mediterranean sea are beginning to close their boarders to such ships, believing that countries further inland aren’t doing their share of offering asylum.

And they are right. Recently Merkel and her prop-up coalition (Christian Democratic Union with the smaller Christian Social Union)announced a new migrant plan that includes transit zones (detention centres in all but name) in southern Germany, designed to deport “ineligible asylum seekers”. These are the very sort of centres the European Commission condemned Donald Trump for opening in the US which deliberately split babies and children from their parents and family members.

New direction
Detention centres in Germany will forcerefugees to go elsewhere. A panicked Austria (which took in many refugees during the Bosnian conflict of 1992-95) already has plans to close their borders to stop the refugees from settling in the land-locked state. This would go against the free movement of people policy valued so highly by the European Commission, and they are unlikely to be the last country to put in place such measures.

The culmination of these decisions? The refugees will head for France, Belgium and Britain because other countries are closed.

It’s clearly more complex than what’s outlined above. But the point is clear; Germany, Austria and Italy have already put measures in place to deter migrants. Will Belgium do the same? Brussels is a city of hope and prosperity to some, and the final destination for others but to everyone, it’s a city that needs to do more to protect its growing diverse population.

  • See the Facebook page, Citizen Hosting Platform (Platforme Citoyen) which has  https://www.facebook.com/plateformerefugiesbxl/ and follow the hashtag #HelpIsNoCrime
  • Keep up to date with Matt Hardy via twitter @matthardyjourno and @thepoliticosuk

Engage London has approx 27 members – a lucky eight were able to attend the Brussels summer school at IHECS from 24-28 June. They were Pilion Trust’s Rahim Amin, Favour Ekengwu, Naomi Gahie, Charlie Tshibangu and City’s journalism undergrads Matt Hardy, Alun Macer-Wright, Diana Serenli, Meagan Walker. Big thanks to Engage Europe for creating this opportunity.

 

The Facebook group that enables Belgians to offer homestays to migrants.

Brussels: meeting Julie Ward MEP #5

During the Engage Europe workshops there was an opportunity for British young people from Engage London to go and visit the European Parliament. Here’s a podcast of how Julie Ward MEP feels about Brexit (not good). This is an 8 minute podcast put together by City Uni’s Alun Macer-Wright.

First time visit to the European Parliament for five of Engage London’s team – Charlie, Favour, Alun, Diana and Naomi – who visited Julie Ward, MEP (c) Engage London

Engage London has approx 27 members – a lucky eight were able to attend the Brussels summer school at IHECS from 24-28 June. They were Pilion Trust’s Rahim Amin, Favour Ekengwu, Naomi Gahie, Charlie Tshibangu and City’s journalism undergrads Matt Hardy, Alun Macer-Wright, Diana Serenli, Meagan Walker. Big thanks to Engage Europe for creating this opportunity.

Brussels: sharing ideas #3

The trip to Brussels was an amazing experience writes Favour Ekengwu, one of the Engage London participants at the Engage Europe media workshops.

Scenes from the photo booth at the IHECS hosted party at Loft 58. The workshop participants were from London, Barcelona, Tubingen, Cluj, Mechlen and Brussels. (c) Engage London/Matt Hardy

From the time we got on the train to Brussels the Eurostar stewards were really outgoing and were able to teach us the basics of French.

Favour Ekengwu during the graffiti workshop (c) Engage London/Matt Hardy

The people in Brussels were very approachable. It was an interesting experience; we received a warm welcome from the professors who prepared the programs. They spoke in English which was very helpful because most of understand (it’s the lingua franca of Europe).

Favour Ekengwu during the photo portrait workshop (c) Engage London/Matt Hardy

I particularly enjoyed the photo portrait workshop because we were outside in the city and I got to see what happened within the community. I was intrigued because the neighbourhood was really friendly and they were patient enough to hear us out when we wanted to introduce them to what we were doing in the workshop.

Favour Ekengwu at IHECS, Brussels at the party to celebrate the end of the workshop. (c) Engage London

Engage London has approx 27 members – a lucky eight were able to attend the Brussels summer school at IHECS from 24-28 June. They were Pilion Trust’s Rahim Amin, Favour Ekengwu, Naomi Gahie, Charlie Tshibangu and City’s journalism undergrads Matt Hardy, Alun Macer-Wright, Diana Serenli, Meagan Walker. Big thanks to Engage Europe for creating this opportunity.

Brussels: gallery from Engage Europe summer school #2

Engage London sent eight young people to the Engage Europe media summer school in Brussels, hosted by the programme co-ordinator, IHECS. Here’s the story in eight portraits

1 We’ve arrived in Belgium for summer school (25-28 June 2018)

Brussels Midi – Charlie, Naomi, Nicola, Savvas, Diana, Favour, Meagan, Matt, Rahim (and one more to join us, Alun) (c) Engage London

2 Here’s where we are staying, Hostel Bruegel, close to Sablon

Engage Europe participants meet up – here are students and staff from Spain, Germany and London (UK). There were also staff and students from Cluj-Napol in Romania. (c) Engage London

3 Last team member to join us

Alun Macer-Wright makes the first day’s plenary at IHECS, a journalism/media uni in Belgium, just in time to join the Engage Europe workshops with students and young people from Romania, Spain, Germany, Belgium and the UK. IHECS journalism school is close to the famous Manneken Pis (c) Engage London

4 IHECS journalism school is in the centre of Brussels

IHECS (this pic will be changed to the full group portrait when it is sent on from Engage Europe) (c) Engage London

5 Trip to the European Parliament (Engage Europe is co-funded by the Erasmus Programme of the EU)

First time visit to the European Parliament for five Engage London students – Charlie, Favour Alun, Diana and Naomi – who met Julie Ward, MEP for North West England (c) Engage London

6 A taster from just one of the workshops linking civil society with uni skills – this one involved portrait photography #baghead #ostcollective

In the back streets of Brussels summer school workshop had turned a garage into a photo studio to connect academia with civil society and mix up the formal portrait using skills of #octcollective. Here are Pilion Trust CEO Savvas Panas and Islington Faces’ Nicola Baird in disguise (c) Engage London

7 After sharing our summer school work there were certificates and a party

Scenes from the photo booth at the IHECS hosted party at Loft 58 – Romanians, British, Spanish, German and Belgian students all know how to party. (c) Engage London/Matt Hardy

8 Goodbye lunch

Delicious lunch at Les Cercle des Voyageurs near IHECS, in Brussels (c) Engage London

Engage London has approx 27 members – a lucky eight were able to attend the Brussels summer school at IHECS from 24-28 June. They were Pilion Trust’s Rahim Amin, Favour Ekengwu, Naomi Gahie, Charlie Tshibangu and City’s journalism undergrads Matt Hardy, Alun Macer-Wright, Diana Serenli, Meagan Walker. Big thanks to Engage Europe for creating this opportunity.

Brussels: World Cup round up #1

Round up of watching the Russia 2018 World Cup in Brussels after the inspiring media workshops at the Engage Europe summer school in Belgium. Report by Engage London’s Charlie Tshibangu (England fan) written on the Eurostar back to London just before the Belgium v England game…

Manneken Pis in central Brussels is dressed in the Belgian football strip ready for the England v Belgium game. The statue has his clothes changed twice a day but is naked by night. (c) Engage London

Watching the matches in a bar in Brussels is a great atmosphere, you get to experience the rollercoaster emotions football gives you with a mix of fans such as Portuguese, German, as well as the Belgian fans (while drinking the famous Belgian beer or two!).

Being a football fan myself and watching all the games in Brussels, it made me get to know and look at the city in a different light. They really embraced their team, plastering the city with posters of players and hanging their flags everywhere you looked… which for me was great.

I asked every Belgian person I came across about their thoughts on the big Belgium V England draw scheduled for Thursday 28 June. Surprisingly a few were less optimistic about their squad and their chances of winning against us. Unfortunately for us, and fortunately for them, they ended up beating us 1-0 by a brilliant goal from Adnan Januzaj.

CAPTION: Football is huge in Brussels – here Morocco fans celebrate a draw (2:2 with Spain). Film by Engage London/Matt Hardy

The 2018 Russia World Cup has been eventful so far, two weeks in and there has already been a couple of heartbreaks. The latest disappointment being Germany, the former 2014 World Cup Champions have crashed out of the group stages.

Germany’s first blow came when they lost their opening game 0-1 when they took on an energetic Mexican side, with the young Mexican Lozano nicknamed ‘Chucky’ grabbing the win. When time came to redeem themselves in their second game against Sweden the Germans answered the critics by adding a much needed 3 points to their account when they beat the Swedes 2-1 with Toni Kroos scoring a 90th minute free-kick at the very last seconds of a frustrating game, the goal without a doubt making its way in top 3 position in best goal of the competition.

Moving forward from their 2-1 win, they took on South Korea who were branded this week as one of the worst teams of the competition having failed to win a single game in their campaign.

Germany as expected created a number of chances failing to score a single goal which would later come back to haunt them as South Korea took their chance in on the 90th minute scoring on corner kick. Germany’s demise continued when the world number 1 goalkeeper Manuel Neuer was caught outside his goal which led to a easy tap in by the Tottenham Hotspur striker Heung-Min Son making the final results 0-2 to South Korea.

The Koreans triumph over the Champions, caused them to be eliminated. It’s the earliest exit for Germany since the competition began in 1938. Some might say this could be one of the most shocking moments of the World Cup since Brazil’s humiliating 7-1 defeat back in 2014.

Other teams whose journeys were cut short are Panama, Tunisia, Iceland, Senegal and Nigeria.

Nigeria was the most unfortunate of the bunch after letting their qualification ticket slip when Argentina’s centre back Marcos Rojo’s volley from an 80th minute corner kick.

For everyone it’s a rollercoaster of emotions.

  • Engage London has approx 27 members – a lucky eight were able to attend the Brussels summer school at IHECS from 24-28 June. They were Pilion Trust’s Rahim Amin, Favour Ekengwu, Naomi Gahie, Charlie Tshibangu and City’s Matt Hardy, Alun Macer-Wright, Diana Serenli, Meagan Walker. Big thanks to Engage Europe for creating this opportunity.

Romania workshop: live digital

Nobody on the Engage London team had been to Romania before, so there was real excitement about going to Cluj-Napoca. Here’s a brief photo story showing some of our workshop highlights.

Pic 1: Introducing ourselves

Engage London presentation in Romania by Pandora Khody, Surelle Stevens and Savvas Panas. (c) Engage London

Pic 2: Trying live reporting

Pandora Khody reporting live from Romania. (c) BS/Engage London                                 1)Here’s Pandora Khody reporting about the digital revolution in Cluj.

2) Blow enjoy the TV voice over made about Romanian sport, starring Surelle Stevens.

Pic 3: Getting to know a place

Exploring the streets of Cluj-Napoca on the last morning. (c) SP/Engage London

Barbara, Savvas and Nicola made clear to the Engage London participants before the Romania trip that: “It’s a WORKING TRIP, not a holiday. The visit includes some sightseeing, but attendance and participation at the workshop is expected.” So it was good that there was some sightseeing built into the workshop schedule. We all liked discovering this student city.

Pic 4: Selfie sightseeing

Surelle Stevens: “Cluj was amazing”. (c) SS/Engage London

Summing up
Engage London learnt many things on this trip. Huge thanks to Engage/Inspire Romania for this opportunity. Savvas from the Pilion Trust: “Our visit to Cluj was lovely. Cristina and colleagues picked us up and looked after us so well. We had good interaction with the team.”

There were four teams at Romania, here are the other two films.

 

Meet the team: Charlie Tshibangu

Meet our Engage London team in Brussels. Here’s Charlie Tshibangu. Interview by Favour Ekengwu, Naomi Gahie and Rahmin Amin

Charlie Tshibangu (c) Hugh Gary Photography

Charlie, 23, was looking for employment when this interview was done but has already found a warehouse job.

Q: Where do you live?
I’m from the Congo. I came to London when I was eight. It was weird because I was put into foster care with a Jamaican family. We (Charlie and his siblings) weren’t allowed to speak French. It was difficult.

Q: How come you’re involved in the Pilion Trust?
My friend was here,  Melvin, he brought me here in 2016. I got along with Savvas so I get invited. And he helps me with food if I have no food in the house.

Q: What are your interests?
Football. From 16-18 and a half I used to play reserves for Boreham Wood. I was a centre back so I played in defence. I got realistic, I didn’t think I’d make it.  It’s like the lottery, not everyone makes it.

Q: It’s the World Cup how will you concentrate?
I will do my work but whenever there’s a break then I will want to watch it. I just love football – I like all the teams. I don’t think Brussels will win. Maybe England!

Q: Do you like live football?
I used to work at Arsenal on match days. Every time I watched I couldn’t stop smiling.

Q: What are you expecting from Brussels’ summer school?
Not sure yet.

  • Engage Europe is running a summer school from 24-28 June. 

Meet the team: Favour Ekengwu

Engage London is about putting writing skills into action. Here Favour Ekengwu reports from the Pilion Trust and Alexandra Wylie Tower Foundation Clothing give away (5 June 2018). Favour is also joining the Engage London team for the Brussels workshops.

Favour Ekengwu (c) Hugh Gary Photography

The Pilion Trust’s first clothing give away day for the local Islington Community was hosted at our Ringcross Community Centre. Here we provide help for people within the community who are struggling with multiple complex needs from housing problems and homelessness to family issues; as well as drug and alcohol dependences; mental ill health problems; different levels of learning problems or struggling with many kinds of poverty.

The event was a collaboration; between The Pilion Trust and Alexandra Wylie Tower Foundation (AWTF) who put out the call to the community for the clothing donations.

The Pilion Trust is a multiple complex needs registered charity so we are always focused on what we can do to reach out to all people within our community/neighbourhood. That way we can create a caring neighbourhood, which is why our charity helps people within the local and wider communities.

We run community activities for all age groups within the community. We also run a registered food bank between 12 – 4pm Monday – Friday where all within the community are welcome. We have found that many people within the community are quietly struggling and can’t afford to feed their families also many are street homeless.

The main purpose of the clothing give away was to help people within our community that are not able to help themselves and are overlooked by the government. Unfortunately I don’t think that the councillors are doing enough to help the least privileged within the community. Most of the clients are people who have lost hope that the council are unwilling to help them feel safe within the neighbourhood. This is where we come in. We become the pillar that they can lean on; you can say that we are their representative in a lot of cases.

We believe that everybody within the community deserves an equal chance to live a better life.

We received donations from families that lived within the borough of Islington, and from companies who were aware of the issues that homeless people have and wanted to support our cause. Most of the donated clothes came from Alexandra Wylie Tower Foundation (AWTF). Like us they are a charity and they work with young teenagers who live in poverty they work to ensure that no child is left without a passion for life due to their circumstances

It was the first time that I have ever been involved in a clothing give away day. I came into work very early on that Tuesday morning and found our hall full of clothes. I was amazed when I saw our hall full of clothing; it showed that people within the community want to help each other. We received a lot of help from the Volunteers that came to help us within the community.

They helped us set the clothes in place so that people could easily locate the things that they needed without any difficulties. I thought it would be impossible due to the amount of clothes we had to set in order.

Fortunately my opinion was wrong; we worked together like a family; even though we hardly knew each other. We complimented, helped and laughed together which made the place feel like home. I then realised that’s what it means to be a community.

The outcome was good, a lot of people showed up, we were also able to meet the needs of most of the clients, with the massive support that we got from the donors our clients left with smiles on their faces. From my point of view there were lots of clothes that they could pick from I picked a few myself. I was intrigued on how much awareness we raised within the community, it was so effective that after that day everyone wanted to get more involved with what we are trying to achieve; which moves us a step is closer to achieving our purpose.

We received a lot of things, different sized clothes for men, women, kids and babies. Bedding, shoes etc., things that people would need and can use in their everyday lives.

Despite the fact that it was a long tiring day; everyone looked happy, especially our volunteers.

They were amazing.

I believe that that day was more than a clothing give away, I think that it was a day we got together as a community that wanted to know each other, and offer help to their neighbours. That day brought people of different cultures, races and ethnicities together. I think that people developed a new mind-set of what a clothing give away was about.

It’s about unity, caring and helping those around you that need it. That way no one is left out.

  • Ringcross Community Centre is open all week. Find it at 60 Lough Road, N7 8FE. The food bank is for all. It’s open from 12 noon – 4pm daily and a place to get fresh fruit and veg as well as bread.
  • https://www.awtf.org
  • http://www.piliontrust.info